A Guy’s Fish Committed Credit Card Fraud While Playing His Nintendo Switch

You’ve heard of the “infinite monkey theorem“, where, given enough time, monkeys could type the complete works of Shakespeare.  We mention it because this is kind of like the goldfish version of that.

A few years ago, a YouTuber in Japan rigged up a system that allowed his pet fish to play video games.  But it just backfired after the fish committed credit card fraud.  (???)

He wanted to see if his fish could beat a game called “Pokémon Sapphire” using motion-tracking software.  He put a grid behind the fishbowl with dots that corresponded to different buttons.  If they stopped or turned around in front of one, it told the game they “hit” that button.

The fish eventually beat that game in 3,200 hours, compared to 30 hours for an average gamer.  So he recently tried it with another Pokémon game called “Pokémon Scarlet”.  But it didn’t go as well this time.

Around 1,100 hours in, the game froze while he wasn’t watching.  But the computer running the game stayed on, and the fish were still pressing buttons.

Eventually, they managed to open Nintendo’s e-store and transferred money from his credit card to his Nintendo account.  It was only $4, but could still be considered credit card fraud if a human had done it.

They also used some of his reward points and bought a new avatar, downloaded a Nintendo 64 emulator, and changed his username to a bunch of gibberish.  (They changed it to “ROWAWAWAWA”.)

He eventually saw what was happening seven hours later and reached out to Nintendo to explain what happened.  They reversed the $4 charge for him.

(Here’s the video.  It crashes at :47.)

 

(TechSpot)